Categories: Portfolio

Participated in a Hackathon: ArthritisHack 2017

On the weekend of October 13th to 15th, the #ArthritisHack hackathon took place at the Mars Discover District. It was a cool event and I haven’t attended a hackathon in ages. The last hackathon I attended was a hackathon sponsored by LinkedIn in the same place and before that it was a kind of catch-all hackathon with multiple APIs in the west end of Toronto where people used the Yellow Pages API and Soundcloud API.

At this event, with a team of five, we built a small automated marketing platform for arthritis-focused charity events and built a chatbot to engage people and raise awareness about arthritis.

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Categories: Life

Defcon DC416 Meetup

Attended the Toronto Defcon DC416 meetup last week Wednesday. The presentations were on Stuxnet, data mining of virus/malware signatures, and lockpicking. The lockpicking demonstration was a workshop. Most noteworthy, you could take a try at picking the locks of two small doors. In addition, each door had different grades of locks.

It was a full house!

It was packed! The audience was varied. It consisted of security researchers, computer science students and researchers. The audience also included developers in the industry.

Looking forward to the next few meetups and planning to do a presentation related to the Raspberry Pi and FreedomBox.

Categories: Portfolio

Did a talk at Software Freedom Day in Toronto on “Open Source, Open Allocation”

Click here to see more information about software freedom day in Toronto.

The talk was on 19 September 2015.

Open allocation: people get to decide what to work on and how. Gives people an opportunity to contribute to strategy, business objectives, etc. It’s bottom-up in terms of organization hierarchy.

Closed allocation: people get to decide how to work on something, they’re given the what by their boss, other department, client, etc. This is the typical way things work at a job and in most jobs this will continue to be the case.

Open source projects are open allocation; the maintainer or developer decides what they want to create and then creates it. There’s no external incentive making them give up control over what they want to create.

I’ll be writing more on this subject and hope to do a few more presentations to clarify the ideas, but basically open allocation is the future of (most) work. Our productivity levels are high enough that we can let people have 20% time to think of new projects and to work on them. At a typical company you’re losing value if you don’t let the employees on the front-lines make contributions to the strategy or business objectives of the company.