Categories: Web Dev Training

3 Great Videos about GraphQL

Since GraphQL is a hot topic and a new way of creating APIs for client devices and applications, it helps to learn what it is, how it’s used and why it’s becoming quickly adopted for new projects. So here are 3 great videos on YouTube that explain why your team should explore GraphQL and consider it as a viable technology for your next project.

Lessons From 4 Years Of GraphQL

A reflection on GraphQL’s successes and its evolution within Facebook, the company at which it originated.

Connect Your Angular App To Any GraphQL Backend

At Facebook they use React (it was created there too!) but a lot of companies use AngularJS and now are adopting Angular 2/4/5+. This video shows you how to use it with an Angular app. Angular offers a more complete framework in contrast to React; so if you’re already using it, it’s definitely possible to use it with APIs such as GitHub.

Implementing & Using GraphQL at GitHub

GitHub started to use it for their API in 2016 and revealed it at their yearly event GitHub Universe. They show how they implemented part of the API and then show the client-facing portion through the query explorer. The query explorer is a powerful way to construct and test different API queries.

Categories: Linux, Software Development

First code patch submission in a long time…

UPDATE: It got in, the patch was reviewed, updated and added to the main code base. The developer even added my name to the credits!

I submitted an issue to the Django Rest Framework project. There was a bit of a problem with the documentation’s example not reflecting the code. The oft-repeated “the docs are never updated with the code” line that other programmers like so much ran through my head.

I think the way I presented the issue was solid…providing enough detail about what I was trying to do, the code that failed, the error message that was trigged, the version of the framework I’m using, and pointing the area of the code base that potentially caused my issue: https://github.com/tomchristie/django-rest-framework/issues/955

To remedy this situation, I forked the repository, created a new branch, made the fix, and created a pull request: https://github.com/tomchristie/django-rest-framework/pull/956

Documentation is important, especially when a project has over 1000 users. Updating it should be seen the same way as fixing code or adding new features, it shouldn’t be seen as a chore. As I quoted in a previous post, “some text is better than no text”.

The author of Django Rest Framework, Tom Christie, was super quick to respond. I got a response to the issue within a few hours. The frequency of releases isn’t too bad either, it feels regular and I would definitely continue using the project over tastypie.

I haven’t submitted a patch to any project in a long time, I’ve only reported a few issues and it will be awesome if this patch is accepted.