Blog

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Last weekend I did a technical presentation on the RaspberryPi, a small computer, running the FreedomBox GNU/Linux software. For the free/open source and socio-political spin that I did on the presentation, you can check out my blog at SourceContribute.com.

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To be a tech leader, rather than just a manager, you have to set clear priorities. There are two ways to do this and they apply in different situations. #1 Prioritize and Execute The first way is to pick one task and finish it. That’s it. The book Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy Seals Lead

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In recent times, there have been a couple of tremendously popular blog posts explaining JOINs using Venn Diagrams. After all, relational algebra and SQL are set oriented theories and languages, so … Source: Say NO to Venn Diagrams When Explaining JOINs

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Attended the Toronto Defcon DC416 meetup last week Wednesday, the presentations were on Stuxnet, data mining of virus/malware signatures, and lockpicking. The lockpicking demonstration was a workshop where you could take a try at lockpicking two small doors with different grades of locks. It was packed and the audience was varied, security researchers, computer science

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An employee at SoundCloud has a guide on writing React.js and Redux. The current SoundCloud app is written in Angular.js 1.x and they have their own flux-like library. The guide is a guide on how to build a SoundCloud client web app using React.js and Redux. It’s a perfect demonstration of why metaprogramming is necessary

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Cause and effect diagrams, also known as Ishikawa diagrams, are one of 7 basic tools of quality. You won’t see them used very often in software development or IT projects though they should be. So today we’re going through what cause and effect diagrams are, why they’re useful, an example diagram, and case studies.

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A few days ago I attended the Full Stack Toronto meetup. The theme of this meetup was Celebrating Pride in Tech. The first speaker, James Wilkinson (executive director of Full Stack Toronto), spoke about front-end web development optimizations. What was really cool was the overview of the tools that are available for checking performance. The

I just posted the slides for the talk I did at Software Freedom Day on 19 September 2015. The topic was open source and open allocation and how the two relate and how the future of companies is to mirror the open source development methodology. Open allocation allows workers to choose what they’re working on, with some caveats and limits of course. It works best when developers are aligned with the company mission and organization goals.